English @ OU

Spring 2001 Undergraduate Courses

Return to current courses and course archives.

Note that the courses listed here represent many but not all the courses taught during this particular quarter. Those courses taught by graduate students and part-time instructors are not listed.

Eng51: Freshman Composition: Writing and Rhetoric (requires the use of computers)

Instructor: Mara Holt

Description:

In this course, you will be introduced to college writing through a number of strategies and practices. We will practice various kinds of writing, from informal electronic writing on a Web-based bulletin board to formal essays (interpreting a song, reviewing a film, and analyzing literature) to collages of word and image (in either paper or electronic form). In these projects we will use writing processes that usually involve freewriting exercises, composing of essays, peer critiques, and revision. At times, we will work in groups, at times as individuals. Some writing will happen in class on the computers, while much assigned writing will be due as homework. We'll read about argumentation and using the Web for research and use film reviews, student essays, and literature as texts for discussion. Along the way, you will reflect upon elements in your life and culture that have contributed to the evolution of your tastes in music, film, literature, and images. Work on that will culminate in an essay on the genealogy of your tastes at the end of the term.

Grading/ Attendance:

The course grade will result from the following projects, plus possible reduction or addition based on your attendance. Each essay must be turned in with a reflective statement. Song interpretation 15%; Film review (includes 3 critiques) 20%; Literary analysis (includes 3 critiques) 20%; Graphic/word collage 15%; Genealogy of taste 15%; Other assignments 15%.

Eng51: Freshman Composition: Writing and Rhetoric (requires the use of computers)

Instructor: Albert Rouzie

Description:

You will use writing processes of drafting, peer critiquing, and revising on projects that range across a number of genres: analysis of a song, a film review, literary analysis, analysis of visual images, and autobiography of the evolution of your tastes in these areas (music, film, literature, images). Every class session meets in a computer classroom. Some time will be spent using the computers to do formal and informal writing and to do research using library and internet materials. Some time will be class discussion. The class will use a web site in the Blackboard system, primarily the electronic discussion board features. We may use other computer conferencing resources as deemed necessary. Along the way we will discuss concepts of argument and rhetoric to shape your awareness of the situations and possibilities of written communication.

Readings:

Lunsford and Ruszciewicz, Everything's an Argument. A writing handbook such as by Hacker. Handouts such as film reviews and on-line reviews, short fiction, and other readings.

Exams/Papers:

Five papers/projects.

Eng 152: Freshman Composition: Writing and Reading

Instructor: Jackie Glasgow

Description:

This course is designed to facilitate your development into a confident and responsible writer. You will be introduced to a variety of tools and strategies for effective writing. We will focus the reading and writing around social justice issues in Young Adult Literature. We will read one common novel and then you will choose books from a list that best fit your topic and interests. The final product will be a multigenre project that includes all your writing for the quarter.

Readings:

Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse; your choice of 5 other YA novels

Exams/Papers:

Multigenre paper consisting of 10 pieces (poems, dialogues, journalism, essays, + choices).

Eng 200: Introduction to Literature

Instructor: Linda Rice

Description:

"There must be a period and an end to all temporal things... an end of names and dignities and whatsoever is earthly" (Sir Ranulphe Crewe, 1558-1646). But how do we come to terms with mortality, and how should we live our lives knowing that we will die? These are the central questions of this section of English 200. Included in this investigation will be works by Mitch Albom, Jean-Dominique Bauby, John Donne, Margaret Edson, C.S. Lewis, Larry McMurtry, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Thornton Wilder, and Walt Whitman. Through extensive reading/viewing, discussion, and writing about literature and film, participants will develop an appreciation for language and the defining characteristics of diverse genres and gain new insight into what will seem most important to each of us about life as that life comes to an end.

Readings:

Reading will be chosen/assigned from the following: Mitch Albom, Tuesdays with Morrie; Jean-Dominique Bauby & Jeremy Leggatt, The Diving Bell & the Butterfly; John Donne, from The Holy Sonnets; Margaret Edson, Wit; C.S. Lewis, A Grief Observed; Larry McMurtry, Terms of Endearment; Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, On Death and Dying; Thornton Wilder, Our Town; Walt Whitman, "Out of Cradle Endlessly Rocking" from Sea-Drift

Exams/Papers:

Routine reading quizzes; Discussion and hands-on activities; Multigenre paper; Final project/presentation.

Eng 201: Critical Approaches to Fiction

Instructor: Mara Holt

Description:

We will read, write about and discuss American short fiction of the 20th century and screen two films based on two of the stories. We will discuss and apply a number of critical approaches to interpreting fiction, including formalist, reader-response, feminist, and marxist criticism. At times, you will bring some written responses to assigned questions to class for small group work, and many classes will be whole-class discussions.

Readings:

American Short Story Masterpieces. Eds. Raymond Carver and Tom Jenks. New York: Dell, 1989. Alexie, Sherman. The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. New York: HarperPerennial, 1994.

Exams/Papers:

There will be two short exams (some short-answer and some paragraph-length answers) at the fourth and seventh weeks. A paper on The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven is due during the final exam period.

Eng 202: Critical Approaches to Poetry

Instructor: Kenneth Daley

Description:

Eng 202: Critical Approaches to Poetry

Instructor: Mark Halliday

Description:

We have two main goals: to introduce you to a wide variety of poetic forms, styles, and subjects, ranging across at least five centuries of English and American poetry; and to develop your ability to understand poems—what they try to do, how they try it, why they might matter to you.

Readings:

We'll have The Norton Anthology of Poetry and will read at least fifty poems in it; and we'll read many contemporary poems in photocopy as well (maybe in a course pack).

Exams/Papers:

There will be two "take-home" tests, involving short answers and paragraph answers; and there will be a final exam.

Eng 203: Critical Approaches to Drama

Instructor: John Matthews

Description:

This course will focus on the reading of plays as texts, keeping in mind their ostensible destination, the stage. There are, of course, two sorts of stage: those actual physical structures upon which Hamlet is acted, again and again, and that interior, metaphorical stage of our imaginations, created by our interaction with the text while reading. There is a special intimacy in reading a play, for we are engaged in a direct, though tacit, collaboration with the playwright, exemplifying the principle that every text is a game that an author plays which enables a reader to play it afterwards.

Readings:

To be selected.

Exams/Papers:

Both, representing plenty of work.

Eng 210: Critical Approaches to Popular Literature

Instructor: Robert Miklitsch

Description:

In this course, we will engage a number of popular American fictions. The aim will be to develop critical strategies that enable us to attend to the specificities of a particular text, those codes it mobilizes to realize itself as a novel or short story. In addition to this formal or textual emphasis, we will also be concerned—as much as possible—to situate the text in question within its historical and socio-cultural context. Finally, we will examine how the various texts articulate, or disarticulate, issues of race, class, gender, ethnicity, etc.

Readings:

There will be a number of short stories and three or four novels.

Exams/Papers:

As the above description perhaps suggests, there will be quite a bit of reading. In addition to regular quizzes on said reading, there will be three papers: two short ones (3-5 pp.), and a longer one, which will be due at the end of the quarter (7-10 pp.). Attendance and participation are, as per usual, mandatory.

Eng 302: Shakespeare's Comedies

Instructor: Loreen Giese

Description:

This course is a study of four Shakespearean comedies: The Taming of the Shrew (1592), Much Ado about Nothing (1598), As You Like It (1599) and Twelfth Night (1601). We will analyze these plays in terms of their structure, characterization, action, language, and the like, and will pay special attention to the issue of sex and bondage: namely, the social containments that control and bind sexuality, such as, the political and social structures that inform gender roles for females and males. With this perspective in mind, we will examine these plays with relation to the social contexts of their production in the sixteenth-, seventeenth-, and twenty-first—centuries. We will also give attention to the issue of textuality in terms of the cultural reproduction of Shakespeare—Shakespeare on the page, on the stage, and on the screen.

Readings:

Taming of the Shrew (1592), Much Ado (1598), As You Like It (1599), and Twelfth Night (1601).

Exams/Papers:

Two short papers and one long paper.

Eng 303: Shakespeare's Tragedies

Instructor: Barry Roth

Description:

Reading tragedies by Shakespeare (and perhaps by some of his contemporaries as well) to determine what he made of the form. Plus inquiries into the nature of tragedy itself. And maybe a non-tragedy by WS for comparison?

Readings:

Not yet determined but I'm sure it will be yummy.

Exams/Papers:

Exams, papers, and quizzes.

Eng 303: Shakespeare's Tragedies

Instructor: Loreen Giese

Description:

"The Pleasures of Perversion." This course will examine four Shakespeare tragedies: Titus Andonicus, Hamlet, Lear, and Coriolanus. We will analyze these plays in terms of their structure, characterization, language, action, and the like, paying special attention to the construction of gender and sexuality and the ideologies behind definitions of perversion.

Exams/Papers:

Two short and one long paper.

Eng 305J: Technical Writing (Physical science majors only)

Instructor: Christine Freeman

Description:

The primary purpose of this course is to provide students in the sciences with an opportunity to practice writing within their majors. Students are expected to have a knowledge base within the physical sciences, since most examples used in class require more than a layperson's understanding of the field. The course focuses on how to review prior research, how to propose research projects, how to incorporate research results into final reports—and how to write clearly and concisely.

Readings:

Martha Davis, Scientific Papers and Presentations; The Mayfield Handbook of Technical and Scientific Writing, the National Academy of Sciences; On Being a Scientist; several research articles within the student's field

Exams/Papers:

Reading quizzes; Writing Projects: abstracts, research proposal, literature review, poster presentation.

Eng 306J: Women and Writing

Instructor: Beth Quitslund

Description:

This class has two goals. First, we'll intellectually explore what it has meant for women to write in the twentieth century, and how literary writing mirrors, creates, and revises versions of feminine identity; the two texts we'll read, both major works for twentieth-century Anglo-American feminism, focus on feminine autonomy, the value of art in general and fiction in particular, and the economic and political circumstances that affect all women, but especially women writers. Second, we'll work together to improve your own capacity for writing what you mean and controlling the effect that your writing creates. To this end, we'll practice writing in both public and private modes, including personal response journals, short analytic pieces, and argumentative essays. We'll also think about what Woolf and Lessing we read can teach writers at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Readings:

Lessing, The Golden Notebook; Woolf, A Room of One's Own. Books will be available exclusively at Little Professor.

Exams/Papers:

Approximately seven short, informal papers; two extended formal essays.

Eng 306J: Women and Writing

Instructor: Janis Holm

Description:

This course, a junior advanced composition course focusing on women and writing, is intended to satisfy the upper-level undergraduate writing requirement while providing students an opportunity to focus on gender issues. We will investigate the phenomenon of writing as women in a male-dominated culture, examining the implicit and explicit assumptions that direct our thinking and reading and writing.

Readings:

Diana Hacker, A Writer's Reference (3rd ed.) Exercises to Accompany A Writer's Reference. Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Journey Proud: Southern Women's Personal Writings.

Exams/Papers:

3 formal papers (70%); Weekly quizzes (20%); Journal, due as the final exam (50 pp. required); Informal papers, homework, attendance (10%).

Eng 307J: Writing and Research in English Studies

Instructor: James Davis

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 308J: Advanced Composition (requires use of computers)

Instructor: Barry Thatcher

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 308J: Advanced Composition

Instructor: Joseph McLaughlin

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 308J: Advanced Composition

Instructor: Barry Thatcher

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 311: English Literature to 1500

Instructor: Beth Quitslund

Description:

A focused survey of literature in Middle English, drawing on material from the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries. We'll explore a range of genres and concerns during this period of explosive growth in vernacular literature. Issues likely to arise include class, faith, the Church, the nature of late medieval political power, and the interplay between Continental literary influences and native traditions.

Readings:

Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Gawain and the Green Knight; Langland, Piers Plowman; The Book of Margery Kempe; and one or more Middle English mystery plays. Books will be available exclusively at Little Professor.

Exams/Papers:

Two discussion papers, a group presentation, midterm exam, a longish (7-8 pp.) formal paper, and a final exam.

Eng 313: English Literature: 1660-1800

Instructor: Jeremy Webster

Description:

This course surveys British drama, poetry, and prose from the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660 to the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789. Between these important historical events, England experienced several profound cultural changes. We will trace how changes in taste, in the status of women, in the rise of the middle class, and in the enslavement of Africans are reflected in Britain's literature during this century. We will accomplish this goal by focusing on five major authors: Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Richard Sheridan, Fanny Burney, and Olaudah Equiano.

Readings:

Oroonoko, The Rover, and Other Works by Aphra Behn (Penguin); Selected Poetry by Alexander Pope (Penguin); The Rivals and School for Scandal by Richard Sheridan (Dover); Evelina by Fanny Burney (Oxford World's Classics); The Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano by Olaudah Equiano (Bedford).

Exams/Papers:

2 papers, reading quizzes, and a small group presentation.

Eng 314: English Literature: 1800-1900

Instructor: Kenneth Daley

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 315: English Literature: 1900-Present

Instructor: Mark Halliday

Description:

Mainly we will study four novels and one poet. The emphasis will be on thorough understanding of these five texts rather than on a wider survey of the period.

Readings:

The novels will be: Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence (1913), A Passage to India by E. M. Forster (1924), Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf (1925), and one more recent novel (probably by A. S. Byatt or Penelope Fitzgerald or Angela Carter). The poet will be Philip Larkin (1922-1985). In addition we'll read a few poems by other poets such as W. H. Auden, Edwin Muir, Stevie Smith, Ted Hughes.

Exams/Papers:

There will be two "take-home tests" involving specific questions about the readings and points made in class. There will be one 7-page paper due near the end of the quarter involving comparison of two texts. (There may also be one quiz early in the quarter.)

Eng 321: American Literature to 1865

Instructor: Tom Scanlan

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 322: American Literature: 1865-1918

Instructor: Tom Scanlan

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 323: American Literature: 1918-Present

Instructor: Robert DeMott

Description:

"From the Waste Land to the Border Land: A View of American Writing." This course is a survey of 20th Century American literature that mixes canonical and non-canonical writers to establish a revised map of modern and contemporary American literature. Course treats fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and some drama and films. Beginning point is roughly T. S. Eliot's modernist poem The Waste Land, and ending point is roughly Gloria Anzaldua's hybrid text, Borderlands/La Frontera.

Readings:

Readings are in Heath Anthology of American Literature, Volume 2, plus a coupe of other books, titles yet to be determined, but probably keyed into some of the writers who will be appearing at the annual Literary Festival in May.

Exams/Papers:

Two short papers, a mid term essay, and a final take home essay/project. Also weekly study responses.

Eng 327: African American Literature: Fiction

Instructor: Stacy Morgan

Description:

From the eighteenth and nineteenth century autobiographies of former slaves to the recent work of such authors as Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, African American prose writing has dealt extensively with quests for individual and collective self-definition. This course will address a series of interrelated questions through a detailed examination of fiction by six/seven authors who offer markedly divergent explorations of this theme: What have been the primary obstacles to the attainment of African American individual and collective self-definition and how have authors of fiction responded to these obstacles? How have these obstacles and the nature of literary responses to such challenges changed over time? At what points have efforts for personal self-definition come into conflict with assertions of collective black identity for African American literary protagonists? By the same token, at what points have quests for individual and collective African American self-definition served to complement and energize one another? In what ways have issues such as spirituality, gender, sexuality, class, and geography intersected with these struggles for racial and human self-definition?

Readings:

Some combination drawn from the following. . . WilliamWells Brown, Clotel, or The President's Daughter. Nella Larsen, Quicksand and Passing. Richard Wright, Uncle Tom's Children. Alice Walker, Meridian. Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo. Toni Cade Bambara, The Salt Eaters. Toni Morrison, Beloved. Randall Kenan, Let the Dead Bury Their Dead.

Exams/Papers:

Requirements for this course most likely will include three 4-5 page papers, quizzes, the submission of daily discussion topics or questions based on the readings, and regular participation in class discussion.

Eng 328: African American Literature: Poetry

Instructor: Stacy Morgan

Description:

Where does African American poetry fit into the larger body of American poetry? To what extent can we speak of a unified tradition of African American poetry? If there is such a tradition, what are its defining characteristics? How do we make sense of verse crafted by African American writers which falls outside of such parameters? What can an awareness of historical context contribute to our understanding of poetry? What sorts of social, cultural, and political work have African American writers called upon poetry to perform? We will attend to these and other questions by examining material which ranges chronologically from such 18th & 19th century literary forerunners as Phillis Wheatley and Paul Laurence Dunbar to the work of such contemporary poets as Rita Dove and Yusef Komunyakaa.

Readings:

Arnold Adoff, ed., The Poetry of Black America. Rita Dove, Thomas and Beulah. Robert Hayden, Collected Poems. A photocopy packet of additional poems.

Exams/Papers:

Requirements for this course most likely will include regular journal entries, a final paper, a group presentation, and regular participation in class discussion.

Eng 351: History of the English Language

Instructor: Marsha Dutton

Description:

This course surveys the growth of English from its Indo-European beginnings into twentieth-century American English, with special attention to regional American dialects and African American English. We will be constantly confronting the reality that language changes over time and varies over space, studying linguistic concepts and terminology that allow us to recognize and describe that change and variation.

Readings:

Albert C. Baugh and Thomas Cable, A History of the English Language.

Exams/Papers:

2 papers (15-20 pages), an observation journal, frequent short quizzes, a final exam.

Eng 352: The Development of American English

Instructor: David Bergdahl

Description:

An introduction to the varieties of American English, esp. the regional and social varieties and the linguistics needed to understand them. Phonetics (IPA) will be taught.

Readings:

Walt Wolfram and Natalie Schilling-Estes, American English (1998)

Exams/Papers:

There will be a midterm and a final exam, a 5-10 pp. paper, and participation in the class's forum (an "electronic journal").

For more info: check out my webpage http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~bergdahl/352/

Eng 356: Adolescent Literature

Instructor: Jackie Glasgow

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the genre of adolescent literature. We will examine the characteristics of these various types of literature and give some attention to current issues of and trends in the field of young adult literature. A particular focus of the course will be social justice issues in young adult literature.

Readings:

Common reading: Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse. Students will choose other honor books to read to meet course requirements.

Exams/Papers:

Students will complete eight reader response activities and a class project.

Eng 361: Creative Writing: Fiction

Instructor: Joan Connor

Description:

In exercises we will develop aspects of the short story: dialogue, sensory description, setting, characterization, beginnings, and point of view. In assigned readings and student stories, we will focus on what makes a story tick.

Readings:

Packet, The Passionate Accurate Story, and The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction.

Exams/Papers:

Two stories, a short-short, exercises, final portfolio.

Eng 361: Creative Writing: Fiction

Instructor: John Matthews

Descriptions:

This course is designed to study the art of narrative by means of short stories—not as a professional course preparing you to get published, but to help you understand fiction "from the inside," along with how all of us organize our experiences by means of language and narrative principles. There will be great emphasis upon precisions of language.

Readings:

A Worker's Writebook, by Jack Matthews, along with possible other assigned texts.

Exams/Papers:

A portfolio consisting of 20 pages of finished narrative, a "piggy-back" journal, focused upon that of a successful writer (to be kept daily) and all notes, drafts, and assignments for the quarter. (If you think of this course as an easy "A", think again.)

Eng 362: Creative Writing: Poetry

Instructor: Jill Rosser

Description:

While we will read a generous number of modern and contemporary poems in order to better understand our options and contexts as writers, more than half of our classtime will be in workshop format (orally critiquing student work). Students will produce at least one poem per week in addition to brief exercises and an informal journal in response to readings in our anthology. Evaluation will be based on the quality of the work produced (gathered with some revision in a final portfolio), and on workshop citizenship.

Readings:

Robert Wallace and Michelle Boisseau, Writing Poems.

Exams/Papers:

Occasional quizzes, journal, final portfolio

Eng 393: Creative Writing Workshop: Short Story

Instructor: Joan Connor

Description:

Using exercises, published stories, and student work, we will focus on developing as authors and critics. The emphasis is on student participation. We will pay close attention to the co-active elements of fiction—setting, plot, character, theme, mood/tone, and, particularly, point-of-view.

Readings:

Writing Fiction, Janet Burroway. The Granta Book of the American Short Story, ed. Richard Ford.

Exams/Papers:

Two stories, one revision, one short-story, writing exercises, and a final portfolio.

Eng 395: Creative Writing Workshop: Nonfiction

Instructor: David Lazar

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 399: Literary Theory

Instructor: Robert Miklitsch

Description:

This course will offer an introduction to literary theory and cultural studies. We will endeavor, as much as possible, to cover the extensive terrain of contemporary criticism, which includes not only historically important critical discourses such as Marxism and feminism, structuralism and psychoanalysis, but rather more recent, emergent perspectives such as gay/lesbian, African-American, and post-colonial theory.

Readings:

Texts will include one "secondary" overview (Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, John Storey), an anthology of "primary" material (xeroxes) as well as illustrative fictions (e.g., Ian Fleming's Dr. No).

Exams/Papers:

In addition to regular quizzes on the reading, there will be three papers: two shorter ones (3-5 pp.), which will be due during the course of the quarter, and a final longer one, which will be due at the end of the quarter (7-10 pp.). Attendance and participation are, as per usual, mandatory.

Eng 399: Literary Theory

Instructor: George Hartley

Description:

Recent issues in literary theory and study of literary texts with a focus on poetry and poetics.

Readings:

Authors will likely include Plato, Heidegger, Derrida, Kristeva, Dylan Thomas, and some Language Poets.

Eng 456: Children's Literature

Instructor: James Davis

Description:

To be announced.

Eng 460: Literary Topics

Instructor: George Hartley

Description:

This course will introduce you to a variety of contemporary Chicano poets from the 1960s to the present. One focus of our study will be the social and political development of Chicanismo as the context which shaped the poetry, that is, the shifts in Chicano politics from a focus on ethnicity to gender to sexuality.

Readings:

Poets we will study include Rodolfo "Corky" Gonzales, Alurista, Carmen Tafoya, Lorna Dee Cervantes, and Francisco Alarc´┐Żn.

Eng 464: Authors: English

Instructor: Jeremy Webster

Description:

Since the premiere of her first play, The Forced Marriage, in 1670, Aphra Behn has been both praised and denigrated for her frank examinations of and progressive views on female sexuality and the 'battle of the sexes.' After living in the Americas and then serving as a spy in the Netherlands, she was the first English woman to earn her living by writing. Behn is now recognized as one of the most important dramatists and poets of the late seventeenth-century and is widely acknowledged as one of the founding mothers of the English novel. This course will examine some of Behn's major works of poetry, prose, and drama. We will organize our readings around Janet Todd's biography of this remarkable woman and will be particularly interested in examining Behn's contributions to literary, feminist, and political history.

Readings:

Oroonoko and Other Writings by Aphra Behn. The Rover and Other Plays by Aphra Behn. Love Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister by Aphra Behn. The Secret Life of Aphra Behn by Janet Todd.

Exams/Papers:

Reading quizzes, annotated bibliography, an oral presentation, 2 papers.

Eng 466: Authors: International

Instructor: Barry Roth

Descriptions:

Investigating and enjoying one of the greats: What makes Chekhov Chekhov? And: How does he do it? And do it over and over and over?

Readings:

Many short stories / all the major plays.

Exams/Papers:

Exams, papers, quizzes.

Eng 481: Form and Theory: Fiction

Instructor: Darrell Spencer

Descriptions:

In this class on the form and theory of fiction we'll focus on contemporary short stories. Our starting point will be the distinction Miriam Clark makes between "the breakdown of narration" and "the narration of breakdown." We'll explore the theory that both explains and drives much of the fiction that has been written in the past twenty years. Our goal is to understand what it means, as Clark puts it, for fiction to offer not meaning but narrativity itself as a vital power in storytelling.

Readings:

Packet of essays focused on particular theory and authors, stories.

Exams/Papers:

Discussion papers and responses, a final exam, and a final paper (your own short story and a critical reading of it).

Eng 486: Advanced Workshop: Poetry

Instructor: Erin Belieu

Description:

To be announced.

Hum 109: Great Books: Modern

Instructor: Mark Rollins

Description:

We will read and discuss some important works of 18th-, 19th- and 20th- century Western literature. Classes consist of brief lectures as a preparation for class and group discussions. Students should be prepared and willing to share their ideas in class. Attendance is required.

Readings:

Textbook TBA. Authors (tentative) include Pope, Voltaire, Blake, Wordsworths (both), Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Yeats, Woolf

Exams/Papers:

Two short (3-5) page focused papers in response to questions discussed by the student and the instructor, and one longer paper on a more comprehensive topic. Occasional quizzes based on the day's reading assignment.

Hum 309: Great Books: Modern

Instructor: Mark Rollins

Description:

We will read and discuss some important works of 18th-, 19th- and 20th- century Western literature. Classes consist of brief lectures as a preparation for class and group discussions. Students should be prepared and willing to share their ideas in class. Attendance is required

Readings:

Textbook TBA. Authors (tentative) include Pope, Voltaire, Blake, Wordsworths (both), Dostoevsky, Ibsen, Yeats, Woolf

Exams/Papers:

Two short (3-5) page focused papers in response to questions discussed by the student and the instructor, and one longer paper on a more comprehensive topic. Occasional quizzes based on the day's reading assignment.

T308 407A: Darwin Among the Poets

Instructor: Joseph McLaughlin

Description:

The year 1859 saw the publication in England of an unusually large number of major works: Darwin's Origin of Species, Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities, Eliot's and Meredith's first novels Adam Bede and The Ordeal of Richard Fevere, the first volume of Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Fitzgerald's Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Mill's On Liberty, and Samuel Smiles's Self Help. Through this rich variety of texts, we will examine crucial Victorian issues, trying to see how they come together in 1859. The touchstone for our endeavor will be Darwin's monumental, arguably the most important book published in the nineteenth century. The class will focus on three other works to explore ways that science, political economy, fiction, and poetry speak to some of the same ideas. We will attempt to synthesize the historical, social, religious, and artistic contexts of Darwin and think about ways his work arose in and from a common intellectual environment. Class discussion, team projects, and research will be an important part of the course because, ideally, our purpose is not to demonstrate relationships among diverse practices but to discover them.

Readings:

Charles Darwin, The Origin of Species; Alfred Tennyson, The Idylls of the King; John Stuart Mill, On Liberty; George Eliot, Adam Bede; William Morris, "The Defence of Guenevere".

Exams/Papers:

Two Papers (5-7pp); Reading Journal; In-Class Presentation; Team Project

T308 407C: The Existential Vision: Philosophy, Literature, and Film

Instructor: David McWilliams

Description:

This course will explore a unifying theme of European and American culture since World War II by focusing on the problems raised by the existential philosophers but confronted also by writers and film makers of the period. We will discuss these thinkers and artists thematically, examining characteristic themes such as the death of God, anxiety, absurdity, and the necessity of commitment. We will also, however, approach these figures formally, exploring the distinctive philosophical literary, and cinematic strategies that they employ in exploring these themes. Some of the philosophical essays we will read are difficult. Students who are unwilling to give these texts the time and patient attention they require should not take this course.

Readings:

Essays by Sartre, Camus, Nietzche, and Heidegger; plays and novels by Sartre, Camus, and Kafka; films by Bergman, Fellini, Godard, and others.

T308 407P: Sin, Sex, West Legal History

Instructor: Miriam Shadis

Description:

To be announced.

T308 497D: Feminist Film: Aesthetics and Politics

Instructor: Kasia Marciniak

Description:

As a Tier III synthesis class, this course has a multifarious, interdisciplinary intent:

  • to train students in critical film analysis
  • to study "film language," focusing on cinematic terms and formal terminology
  • to survey the contributions of women directors to the history of the motion picture with a specific focus on contemporary feminist cinema and theory
  • to expose students to the discourse of contemporary feminist theory (specifically queer, postmodern, and postcolonial theory) in a larger context of current feminist politics and aesthetics
  • to practice strategies for successful critical, argumentative writing about films and visual texts. "Feminist Film" is positioned at the intersection of three disciplines: English, Film, and Women's Studies. The goal is to offer students an opportunity to contextualize various areas of study in order to engage them in the process of critical inquiry about the following issues: What is a visual politics of representation? What is the difference between being represented and representing oneself? What is feminist film language and how does it operate? What are the strategies of resistance that women artists have historically practiced to examine and question patriarchal ideology and homophobic discourse? How have women of color been re-negotiating the impact of Eurocentric traditions in mainstream media on various racial and ethnic groups and their representation? In class discussions and in written assignments students will be asked to engage theoretical discourse, specifically feminist theory.

Readings:

Texts: Key Concepts in Cinema Studies (Susan Hayward). A Short Guide to Writing about Film (Timothy Corrigan).

Theoretical Readings: Maya Deren "Cinema as an Art Form." bell hooks "The Oppositional Gaze: Black Female Spectators." Teresa de Lauretis "Rethinking Women's Cinema: Aesthetics and Feminist Theory." E. Shohat, R. Stam "Unthinking Eurocentrism." E. Shohat "Gender and Culture of Empire: Towards a Feminist Ethnography of the Cinema." F. Solanas, O. Gettino "Towards a Third Cinema."

Exams/Papers:

Weekly explication responses, independent project/formal essay, take home exam

return to top